MarkBailey and Leanne Phearman Family Tree


Heinrich Hansen.Heinrich married Christina Sophia Christiansen in 1899.

Christina Sophia Christiansen [Parents] was born on 8 Apr 1878 in Schleswig Holstein, Germany. She died on 5 Dec 1965 in Charles City, Iowa. She was buried on 7 Dec 1965 in Memorial Park, Mason City, Iowa. She married Heinrich Hansen in 1899.

They had the following children:

  M i Herman Hansen.
  F ii Marie Hansen died on 7 Dec 1961.
  F iii Erna Hansen.
  M iv Rudolph Hansen.
  M v Arnold Hansen.
  M vi Everette Hansen.

William Prickett.William married Carol Nicholson.

Carol Nicholson [Parents].Carol married William Prickett.

They had the following children:

  M i Billy Prickett.
  F ii Renae Prickett.
  F iii April Prickett.

Christopher Fredrick Wohlert.

He had the following children:

  M i Christopher Wohlert.

Thomas W. Carter was born in 1808/1810. He married Eliza.

Eliza was born about 1810 in In. or Ky.. She married Thomas W. Carter.

They had the following children:

  F i Mary Elizabeth Carter was born on 10 Jul 1829.

John Sears [Parents] was born on 25 May 1741 in Prince George Co. Va. He died in 1800 in Dinwiddie Va.. He married Sarah Peebles or Peoples.

Sarah Peebles or Peoples was born on 24 Sep 1741. She married John Sears.

They had the following children:

  M i Peter Sears was born on 5 Apr 1787. He died on 12 Jul 1863.
  M ii Paul Sears was born on 14 Dec 1768. He died on 14 Apr 1841.
  F iii Elizabeth Sears was born on 31 Aug 1770. She died in 1810.
  F iv Huldah Sears was born on 11 Nov 1772 in Prince George Co. Va. She died in 1838.
  M v John Sears was born on 4 Feb 1775 in Prince George Co. Va. He died on 10 Jul 1817.
  F vi Sarah Sears was born on 21 Sep 1777.
  F vii Martha Sears was born on 4 May 1780. She died in Apr 1850.
  M viii Samuel Sears was born on 13 Aug 1783 in Prince George Co. Va. He died on 6 Oct 1785.
  F ix Hannah Sears was born on 5 May 1787.

Peter Brodersen.

He had the following children:

  M i Henry Brodersen.
  M ii Brodersen.

Charles, Dr. Graves [Parents] was born on 12 Oct 1815 in Sunderland, Mass. He died on 7 Mar 1878. He married Sarah Cleveland on 20 Jun 1835.

Sarah Cleveland [Parents] was born on 28 Aug 1817 in Oneida Co, N.Y.. She died on 8 Feb 1875 in Plymouth, Iowa. She married Charles, Dr. Graves on 20 Jun 1835.

They had the following children:

  F i Martha Emeline Graves was born on 25 Mar 1836 in Rome, Oneida, New York.
  M ii Charles Henry Graves was born on 28 Oct 1838 in Rome, Oneida, New York.
  M iii William Cleveland Graves was born on 1 Jan 1841. He died .
  U iv Francis Pomeroy Graves was born on 8 Mar 1823 in Rome, Oneida, New York.
  M v George Justin Graves was born on 31 Aug 1845 in Rome, Oneida, New York.
  M vi James Amos Graves was born on 31 Jan 1847 in Annsville, Westchester, New York.
  M vii Austin Davis Graves was born on 8 Sep 1852 in Annsville, Westchester, New York.

Herbert Ivan Wyborny was born on 24 Jun 1905. He died on 15 Nov 1969. He was buried in Rock Falls Iowa. He married Luella Doris Christiansen on 2 Jun 1928.

Luella Doris Christiansen [Parents] was born on 17 Oct 1910. She died on 2 Jun 2008 in Muse Norris Hospice Inpatient Unit in Mason City, IA. She was buried on 5 Jun 2008 in Rock Falls Cemetery. She married Herbert Ivan Wyborny on 2 Jun 1928.

Other marriages:
Kaldenberg, George


ROCK FALLS - Luella Wyborny Kaldenberg, 97, of rural Rock Falls, died Monday (June 2, 2008) at the Muse Norris Hospice Inpatient Unit.

Funeral services will be held 10:30 a.m. Thursday at Old Stone Church, Rock Falls, with the Rev. Jim Turner officiating. Interment will be in Rock Falls Cemetery.

Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. today at the Major Erickson Funeral Home, 111 N. Pennsylvania Ave., and continue at the church one hour prior to the service.

Memorials may be given to Old Stone Church, Rock Falls Cemetery or Hospice of North Iowa and directed to 7 E. Jackson, Rock Falls, IA 50467.

On Oct. 17, 1910, Luella Doris Christiansen was born to Carolina (Wohlert) and John Christiansen. She was the fourth daughter, joining sisters Elsie, Minna and Viola; later two brothers, Leonard and Clarence, completed the family. When Luella was 7 years-old, her mother died. Two years later her father married Meta Peterson. Meta had three sons, Arnold, Arthur and William (Bill). She attended country school through eighth grade and Rock Falls High School. June 2, 1928, she married Herbert Wyborny of Plymouth, and to that union six children were born, Roger, Novella, Marjorie, Arlo, Randy and James. Luella and Herbert were farmers. Luella always had a large garden and canned enough garden products to last a year or longer. She helped her husband during spring planting and fall harvesting by milking cows and feeding all the farm animals. She drove the horses to bring in the wagon loads of corn from the fields and helped unload them.

She sewed all her clothes and the clothes for her daughters as well as patched the overalls and darned the socks. She did quilting, embroidering, crocheting and crafts.

Luella was a member and very active and deeply cared about her church, Old Stone Methodist Church in Rock Falls. For many years, she taught Sunday school and was Sunday school superintendent. She also was head of the Bible school for several years. Luella was a member of United Methodist Women and served as officer of many of the positions.

She was chairperson of many of their fund raising projects. Luella got great enjoyment from her beloved L.U.G.A. 500 card club that was organized by her mother. She joined this club after she was married. She also belonged to the Rock Falls Senior Citizens, Rock Falls Garden Club and the Rock Falls Birthday Club.

She enjoyed inviting friends and family over for meals and playing board games or card games with them. She spent a lot of time with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She often babysat them and she enjoyed playing all kinds of games and putting puzzles together with them. She taught them to sew, crochet, and embroidery and went to many of their sporting events, musicals and dance recitals.

She is survived by four children, Roger (Shirley) Wyborny of Rock Falls, Novella (Don) White of Rock Falls, Randy Wyborny of Longmont, Colo., and James (Christi) Wyborny of Nora Springs; daughter-in-law, Sharon Wyborny of Mason City; son-in-law, Duaine Moore of Scottsdale, Ariz.; brothers, Clarence (Evelyn) Christiansen of Mason City and Leonard Christiansen of Mason City; 14 grandchildren, Vicki (Brian) Pederson, Mark (Lucia) Wyborny, Becky (Russell) Kidd, Tim (Donna) Moore, Monte (Dianne) Moore, Debbie (Don) Risius, Gregg Wyborny, Jeff Wyborny, Lisa Gibson, Anne Wyborny, Eric Wyborny, Libby Wyborny, Aly Wyborny and Kizzy Wyborny; 25 great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents, stepmother, husbands, Herbert Wyborny in 1969 and George Kaldenberg in 1982; daughter, Marjorie Moore, in March 2006; granddaughter, Beth White Ollanik in July 1997; son, Arlo Wyborny in April 2004; and sisters, Viola Bailey, Minna Stupka and Elsie Tibbits.

Major Erickson Funeral Home & Crematory, 641-423-0924. www.majorericksonfuneralhome.com
Published in the Globe Gazette on 6/4/2008.

June 2, 2009
It was a year ago today that Mom, Grandma, Great-Grandma died. I would like to honor and commemorate this milestone by recalling some aspects of her many years. Mom went through many hardships during her life, but she never dwelt on them. When she was almost 8 years old, her mother died. Clarence was 10 months old, Leonard was almost 4, Viola 11, Minna 13 and Elsie 15. Elsie tells about listening in on the party line phone, when her Dad called Uncle George Christiansen asking him to take the children up to the St. Joseph Mercy hospital in Mason City to see their Mother. When Uncle George arrived Elsie had the children all dressed up and standing in a line. At the hospital each child was called up separately to see their Mother and she talked to each of them. Mom told that she was so scared when riding in the elevator. Later that day their Mother died. The girls had to do all the household work with the help of their Dad. Mom's job was to take care of Clarence and Leonard. Their Dad remarried 1 1/2 years later. Both Elsie and Minna worked as hired girls for families in Mason City. Viola did house hold help for the Leonard Bliem family while she attended high school in Rock Falls.

Mom had to help with the usual household chores as she grew up--washing the chimneys and filling the lamps and lanterns with kerosene, carrying wood and cobs in to be burnt in the large kitchen cook stove, scrubbing the floors, pumping the water and bringing it into the house. Their house had a cistern and there was a cistern pump in the wash room located off the kitchen. The house had gas lights in 3 of the downstairs rooms . They ran on pressure and there was a pump up in the attic that was used to keep the pressure up. Later a Delco Battery Electric Lights were added to the house. This system consisted of a series of batteries that were in the basement and a gas engine was used to charge them. The house was heated with radiators using steam heat with coal and wood used to heat the boiler. The house had 8 rooms in it and the parlor was only used when they had company.

Times were not always good. The bottom dropped out of the farm produce as is does sometimes today. One Christmas my Mom remembers each child receiving only one present: an article of clothing of practical use. She received a pair of overshoes, Bill received a cap and she couldn't remember what the other children got. Some Christmases they got oranges. That was the only time they had them. Mom received her early education in the country schools and attended the Rock Falls High School. Some of the time she drove the horse and buggy to high school and put her horse into the barn that was next to the Teacherage. At noon she would go to the barn and give her horse oats to eat and water. Some of the boys that kept their horses there, cleaned her stall for her, so she didn't have to do that.

Mom's folks liked to dance and they often had house dances at their place. Accordion music usually accompanied the dancers. Everyone danced--the adults, young folks, and children. Mom said she really enjoyed the dances. They also went to dances at the Modern Woodman Hall in Rock Falls That is were she met My Dad. They were married on June 2, 1928 at the Mason City Lutheran Church Parsonage . Her folks stood up with them and were the only people there. Her folks, John and Meta, took them out to eat. and then the newly weds took off on their Honeymoon to West Bend, IA. They got as far as Westly, IA and decided it was going to take too long to get there, so they turned around and came back. Dad had bought a new car that spring, a Chevrolet Sedan. Mom learned how to drive this car.

Herbert had farmed with his parents, Rose and Ivan, and in Dec. 1927, Ivan died. He and his mother continued living on the farm that was located 2 1/2 miles east of Plymouth, IA. Dad had taken over all of the farming duties and farmed on shares. Mom moved into the farm house with Dad and Her Mother-in Law. Mom shared household chores with her Mother-in-Law, who was in poor health. She also helped Dad with the outside chores. Mom and Dad did go to a few movies at Mason City both before and after they were married. They also went to many barn dances in the neighborhood and house dances. A year later on June 8, 1929 a Husky 10 lb. 10 1/2 oz. boy was born. They named him Roger.

One time when Mom was working in the garden, she lost her wedding ring. Later on that year, she found it the cucumber patch. Rose Helm Wyborny died Aug. 1929. My folks moved to the present farm in Mar. 1934. Mom did not see the farm until after it was rented. She was very disappointed to leave her nice farm house to move into a house that was built very poorly and was very cold. There wasn't any paint on the buildings and the house was a gray black. The house was heated by a kitchen stove and a wood burning stove in the dining room . The farm had a large barn on it and consisted of 160 acres of good farm land. Those things were very important to my Dad. He said we need good land and more acres to make a living. For 3 weeks , when they moved, Mom had a hired girl that helped with the moving and getting settled. Marge was only 2 months old. I was 22 months, Roger was 4 yr. Mom paid her $2 a week and room and board. Mom would have liked to have kept her longer, but these were hard times, the depression years, and they did not have the money to pay our for wages.

During spring field work, thrashing time and fall harvest, Mom helped with the farm chores and milking. She also raised the chickens and was responsible for feeding them and gathering the eggs. Since we had no running water, water was carried in from the pump for all household uses and carried out again. Washing was done with a gas powered wash machine and baths were taken in a large galvanized laundry tub by the kitchen stove. And then there was the reservoir, for those of you who don't know what a reservoir is--no, its not a large lake--it is a small tank at the end of the cook stove that held water--about a pail of water. And oh, what magic that was--instant hot water--of course, that was only if there was a fire in the stove and you had put water in it. In the winter time, our clothes dryer was lines strung around the dining room. Many of the clothes were hung out side on the lines to freeze dry and then brought in and hung on the lines to finish drying. You didn't need to worry about putting humidity into the house during the winter time. I hated ducking under all the clothes, but my Mom never complained about anything.

When Rural Electricity was put in, my Dad had asked the Landlord to put it in. He also needed a new corn crib-granary. The Landlord said he could have one or the other. My Dad knew it was important to have a good place to keep his crops so they didn't spoil, so he chose the building. The corn crib -granary also had a wide alley way to store machinery. A few years later the folks purchased the farm and in 1942 we got electricity. Since it was during World War 11, there was a manpower shortage and to get the electricity, Dad had to set the poles the 1/4 mile to our place. The neighbors helped him do that. We did not have running water until the middle 40's There is a picture of my Mom down in the ditch helping dig the ditch to run water to the barn.

The folks attended many school events, both at the Country schools that we attended and at the Rock Falls High School and Nora Springs-Rock Falls High School . My Mom continued doing this after my Dad died of Leukemia on Nov. 27, 1982. She had children in school for 33 years, so that is a lot of P.T.A.'s She taught Sunday School for many years and was also in charge of Bible School for 2 weeks every summer. She has been a member of the United Methodist Women for 58 years and held many offices. She has baked many pies, and cooked many chicken and helped serve many dinners and put in many hours of volunteer help with all this organizations many projects. Their biggest project was to furnish and pay off the debt of the Fellowship Hall. For a few years, monthly fund raisers were held.

She always had a big garden and canned over a 100 jars of food. She sewed her own clothes and her children's clothes, she quilted, did crafts, embroidered, and crocheted, darned socks and any thing else that needed to be done. She babysat her Grandchildren and took her grandchildren to various activities and taught them crafts and how to sew and quilt and bake.

We can't end Mom's story without mentioning her love of playing games. Any kind of games, board, cards, dices --what ever. She also enjoyed entertaining and having people over for dinner. She enjoyed all the clubs she belonged to and the people in them. Even though there were many hardships in her life, my Mom would tell you she had a good life.

Even though she is gone physically from our lives, she will always be in our heart. God Bless you Mom! We miss you.

Novella

They had the following children:

  M i Roger Wyborny was born on 8 Jun 1929.
  F ii Novella Wyborny was born on 17 May 1932.
  F iii Marjorie Ann Wyborny was born on 6 Jan 1934. She died on 6 Mar 2006.
  M iv Arlo Wyborny was born on 31 May 1939. He died on 23 Apr 2004.
  M v Randy Wyborny was born on 21 Apr 1945.
  M vi Jim Wyborny was born on 1 Dec 1948.

George Kaldenberg died in 1982. He married Luella Doris Christiansen in 1972.

Luella Doris Christiansen [Parents] was born on 17 Oct 1910. She died on 2 Jun 2008 in Muse Norris Hospice Inpatient Unit in Mason City, IA. She was buried on 5 Jun 2008 in Rock Falls Cemetery. She married George Kaldenberg in 1972.

Other marriages:
Wyborny, Herbert Ivan


ROCK FALLS - Luella Wyborny Kaldenberg, 97, of rural Rock Falls, died Monday (June 2, 2008) at the Muse Norris Hospice Inpatient Unit.

Funeral services will be held 10:30 a.m. Thursday at Old Stone Church, Rock Falls, with the Rev. Jim Turner officiating. Interment will be in Rock Falls Cemetery.

Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. today at the Major Erickson Funeral Home, 111 N. Pennsylvania Ave., and continue at the church one hour prior to the service.

Memorials may be given to Old Stone Church, Rock Falls Cemetery or Hospice of North Iowa and directed to 7 E. Jackson, Rock Falls, IA 50467.

On Oct. 17, 1910, Luella Doris Christiansen was born to Carolina (Wohlert) and John Christiansen. She was the fourth daughter, joining sisters Elsie, Minna and Viola; later two brothers, Leonard and Clarence, completed the family. When Luella was 7 years-old, her mother died. Two years later her father married Meta Peterson. Meta had three sons, Arnold, Arthur and William (Bill). She attended country school through eighth grade and Rock Falls High School. June 2, 1928, she married Herbert Wyborny of Plymouth, and to that union six children were born, Roger, Novella, Marjorie, Arlo, Randy and James. Luella and Herbert were farmers. Luella always had a large garden and canned enough garden products to last a year or longer. She helped her husband during spring planting and fall harvesting by milking cows and feeding all the farm animals. She drove the horses to bring in the wagon loads of corn from the fields and helped unload them.

She sewed all her clothes and the clothes for her daughters as well as patched the overalls and darned the socks. She did quilting, embroidering, crocheting and crafts.

Luella was a member and very active and deeply cared about her church, Old Stone Methodist Church in Rock Falls. For many years, she taught Sunday school and was Sunday school superintendent. She also was head of the Bible school for several years. Luella was a member of United Methodist Women and served as officer of many of the positions.

She was chairperson of many of their fund raising projects. Luella got great enjoyment from her beloved L.U.G.A. 500 card club that was organized by her mother. She joined this club after she was married. She also belonged to the Rock Falls Senior Citizens, Rock Falls Garden Club and the Rock Falls Birthday Club.

She enjoyed inviting friends and family over for meals and playing board games or card games with them. She spent a lot of time with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She often babysat them and she enjoyed playing all kinds of games and putting puzzles together with them. She taught them to sew, crochet, and embroidery and went to many of their sporting events, musicals and dance recitals.

She is survived by four children, Roger (Shirley) Wyborny of Rock Falls, Novella (Don) White of Rock Falls, Randy Wyborny of Longmont, Colo., and James (Christi) Wyborny of Nora Springs; daughter-in-law, Sharon Wyborny of Mason City; son-in-law, Duaine Moore of Scottsdale, Ariz.; brothers, Clarence (Evelyn) Christiansen of Mason City and Leonard Christiansen of Mason City; 14 grandchildren, Vicki (Brian) Pederson, Mark (Lucia) Wyborny, Becky (Russell) Kidd, Tim (Donna) Moore, Monte (Dianne) Moore, Debbie (Don) Risius, Gregg Wyborny, Jeff Wyborny, Lisa Gibson, Anne Wyborny, Eric Wyborny, Libby Wyborny, Aly Wyborny and Kizzy Wyborny; 25 great-grandchildren; many nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her parents, stepmother, husbands, Herbert Wyborny in 1969 and George Kaldenberg in 1982; daughter, Marjorie Moore, in March 2006; granddaughter, Beth White Ollanik in July 1997; son, Arlo Wyborny in April 2004; and sisters, Viola Bailey, Minna Stupka and Elsie Tibbits.

Major Erickson Funeral Home & Crematory, 641-423-0924. www.majorericksonfuneralhome.com
Published in the Globe Gazette on 6/4/2008.

June 2, 2009
It was a year ago today that Mom, Grandma, Great-Grandma died. I would like to honor and commemorate this milestone by recalling some aspects of her many years. Mom went through many hardships during her life, but she never dwelt on them. When she was almost 8 years old, her mother died. Clarence was 10 months old, Leonard was almost 4, Viola 11, Minna 13 and Elsie 15. Elsie tells about listening in on the party line phone, when her Dad called Uncle George Christiansen asking him to take the children up to the St. Joseph Mercy hospital in Mason City to see their Mother. When Uncle George arrived Elsie had the children all dressed up and standing in a line. At the hospital each child was called up separately to see their Mother and she talked to each of them. Mom told that she was so scared when riding in the elevator. Later that day their Mother died. The girls had to do all the household work with the help of their Dad. Mom's job was to take care of Clarence and Leonard. Their Dad remarried 1 1/2 years later. Both Elsie and Minna worked as hired girls for families in Mason City. Viola did house hold help for the Leonard Bliem family while she attended high school in Rock Falls.

Mom had to help with the usual household chores as she grew up--washing the chimneys and filling the lamps and lanterns with kerosene, carrying wood and cobs in to be burnt in the large kitchen cook stove, scrubbing the floors, pumping the water and bringing it into the house. Their house had a cistern and there was a cistern pump in the wash room located off the kitchen. The house had gas lights in 3 of the downstairs rooms . They ran on pressure and there was a pump up in the attic that was used to keep the pressure up. Later a Delco Battery Electric Lights were added to the house. This system consisted of a series of batteries that were in the basement and a gas engine was used to charge them. The house was heated with radiators using steam heat with coal and wood used to heat the boiler. The house had 8 rooms in it and the parlor was only used when they had company.

Times were not always good. The bottom dropped out of the farm produce as is does sometimes today. One Christmas my Mom remembers each child receiving only one present: an article of clothing of practical use. She received a pair of overshoes, Bill received a cap and she couldn't remember what the other children got. Some Christmases they got oranges. That was the only time they had them. Mom received her early education in the country schools and attended the Rock Falls High School. Some of the time she drove the horse and buggy to high school and put her horse into the barn that was next to the Teacherage. At noon she would go to the barn and give her horse oats to eat and water. Some of the boys that kept their horses there, cleaned her stall for her, so she didn't have to do that.

Mom's folks liked to dance and they often had house dances at their place. Accordion music usually accompanied the dancers. Everyone danced--the adults, young folks, and children. Mom said she really enjoyed the dances. They also went to dances at the Modern Woodman Hall in Rock Falls That is were she met My Dad. They were married on June 2, 1928 at the Mason City Lutheran Church Parsonage . Her folks stood up with them and were the only people there. Her folks, John and Meta, took them out to eat. and then the newly weds took off on their Honeymoon to West Bend, IA. They got as far as Westly, IA and decided it was going to take too long to get there, so they turned around and came back. Dad had bought a new car that spring, a Chevrolet Sedan. Mom learned how to drive this car.

Herbert had farmed with his parents, Rose and Ivan, and in Dec. 1927, Ivan died. He and his mother continued living on the farm that was located 2 1/2 miles east of Plymouth, IA. Dad had taken over all of the farming duties and farmed on shares. Mom moved into the farm house with Dad and Her Mother-in Law. Mom shared household chores with her Mother-in-Law, who was in poor health. She also helped Dad with the outside chores. Mom and Dad did go to a few movies at Mason City both before and after they were married. They also went to many barn dances in the neighborhood and house dances. A year later on June 8, 1929 a Husky 10 lb. 10 1/2 oz. boy was born. They named him Roger.

One time when Mom was working in the garden, she lost her wedding ring. Later on that year, she found it the cucumber patch. Rose Helm Wyborny died Aug. 1929. My folks moved to the present farm in Mar. 1934. Mom did not see the farm until after it was rented. She was very disappointed to leave her nice farm house to move into a house that was built very poorly and was very cold. There wasn't any paint on the buildings and the house was a gray black. The house was heated by a kitchen stove and a wood burning stove in the dining room . The farm had a large barn on it and consisted of 160 acres of good farm land. Those things were very important to my Dad. He said we need good land and more acres to make a living. For 3 weeks , when they moved, Mom had a hired girl that helped with the moving and getting settled. Marge was only 2 months old. I was 22 months, Roger was 4 yr. Mom paid her $2 a week and room and board. Mom would have liked to have kept her longer, but these were hard times, the depression years, and they did not have the money to pay our for wages.

During spring field work, thrashing time and fall harvest, Mom helped with the farm chores and milking. She also raised the chickens and was responsible for feeding them and gathering the eggs. Since we had no running water, water was carried in from the pump for all household uses and carried out again. Washing was done with a gas powered wash machine and baths were taken in a large galvanized laundry tub by the kitchen stove. And then there was the reservoir, for those of you who don't know what a reservoir is--no, its not a large lake--it is a small tank at the end of the cook stove that held water--about a pail of water. And oh, what magic that was--instant hot water--of course, that was only if there was a fire in the stove and you had put water in it. In the winter time, our clothes dryer was lines strung around the dining room. Many of the clothes were hung out side on the lines to freeze dry and then brought in and hung on the lines to finish drying. You didn't need to worry about putting humidity into the house during the winter time. I hated ducking under all the clothes, but my Mom never complained about anything.

When Rural Electricity was put in, my Dad had asked the Landlord to put it in. He also needed a new corn crib-granary. The Landlord said he could have one or the other. My Dad knew it was important to have a good place to keep his crops so they didn't spoil, so he chose the building. The corn crib -granary also had a wide alley way to store machinery. A few years later the folks purchased the farm and in 1942 we got electricity. Since it was during World War 11, there was a manpower shortage and to get the electricity, Dad had to set the poles the 1/4 mile to our place. The neighbors helped him do that. We did not have running water until the middle 40's There is a picture of my Mom down in the ditch helping dig the ditch to run water to the barn.

The folks attended many school events, both at the Country schools that we attended and at the Rock Falls High School and Nora Springs-Rock Falls High School . My Mom continued doing this after my Dad died of Leukemia on Nov. 27, 1982. She had children in school for 33 years, so that is a lot of P.T.A.'s She taught Sunday School for many years and was also in charge of Bible School for 2 weeks every summer. She has been a member of the United Methodist Women for 58 years and held many offices. She has baked many pies, and cooked many chicken and helped serve many dinners and put in many hours of volunteer help with all this organizations many projects. Their biggest project was to furnish and pay off the debt of the Fellowship Hall. For a few years, monthly fund raisers were held.

She always had a big garden and canned over a 100 jars of food. She sewed her own clothes and her children's clothes, she quilted, did crafts, embroidered, and crocheted, darned socks and any thing else that needed to be done. She babysat her Grandchildren and took her grandchildren to various activities and taught them crafts and how to sew and quilt and bake.

We can't end Mom's story without mentioning her love of playing games. Any kind of games, board, cards, dices --what ever. She also enjoyed entertaining and having people over for dinner. She enjoyed all the clubs she belonged to and the people in them. Even though there were many hardships in her life, my Mom would tell you she had a good life.

Even though she is gone physically from our lives, she will always be in our heart. God Bless you Mom! We miss you.

Novella


Leonard Rufus Christiansen [Parents] [scrapbook] was born on 11 Sep 1914 in Falls Twp. Cerro Gordo County Iowa. He died on 15 Dec 2008 in Sumner, IA. He was buried on 20 Dec 2008 in Memorial Park Cemetery, Mason City, IA. He married Jessie Evelyn Deets on 27 Jun 1937.

Leonard R. Christiansen, 94, of Sumner, Iowa, formerly of Mason City, died Monday (Dec. 15, 2008) in Sumner.

Funeral services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at the Trinity Lutheran Church, 213 N. Pennsylvania Ave., with Pastor Kathy Graves officiating. Interment will be in Memorial Park Cemetery.

Visitation will be from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday at the Major Erickson Funeral Home, 111 N. Pennsylvania Ave., and continue one hour before the service at the church.

Memorials may be given to the Leonard Christiansen Memorial Fund.

Leonard was born Sept. 11, 1914, in rural Nora Springs, Iowa, the son of John and Carolina (Wolhert) Christiansen. He graduated from Rock Falls High School. Leonard married Jessie E. Deets on June 28, 1937, in Nora Springs. That same year they moved to Ventura, Iowa, where Leonard was engaged in farming for many years. He retired in 1977 and he and Jessie moved to Mason City.

Leonard lived in Kentucky Ridge Assisted Living in Mason City then moved to Sumner, Iowa, where he resided in the Hillcrest Home.

He was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church and the Rock Falls Senior Citizens Center. His interests focused on his farming which included his crops, livestock and some 4,000 laying hens.

Leonard is survived by his son, Leonard R. (Joan) Christiansen of Mobile, Ala.; daughter, Laurie L. (Gary) Stauffer of Sumner; brother, Clarence (Evelyn) Christiansen of Mason City; nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Leonard was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Jessie; daughter, Myrna; and four sisters.

Major Erickson Funeral Home and Crematory, 641-423-0924, www.majorericksonfuneralhome.com <http://www.majorericksonfuneralhome.com>.

Jessie Evelyn Deets [Parents] "Dolly" was born on 8 Dec 1912 in Rockwell Iowa. She died on 6 Mar 2000 in Mason City Iowa. She was buried in Memorial Park Cemetery Mason City Iowa. She married Leonard Rufus Christiansen on 27 Jun 1937.

JESSIE E. "DOLLY" CHRISTIANSEN
JESSIE E. "DOLLY" CHRISTIANSEN MASON CITY - Jessie E. "Dolly" Christiansen, 87, of 1024 15th Place N.E., died Monday (March 6, 2000) at the Muse Norris Hospice Inpatient Unit.
Funeral services will be held at 1:30 p.m. Thursday at Trinity Lutheran Church, Mason City, with the Rev. Kenneth Hatland officiating. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery, Mason City. Visitation will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. today at Major Erickson Funeral Home, 111 N. Pennsylvania Ave., and one hour prior to services at the church. Memorials may be directed to the Jessie E. Christiansen Memorial Fund.
Jessie was born Dec. 8, 1912, in rural Rockwell, the daughter of Benjamin and Anna (Frosch) Deets. She attended school in Rockwell.
Jessie married Leonard R. Christiansen June 28, 1937, at Nora Springs. They moved to Ventura in 1938, then to Mason City in 1977. She was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church, Senior Citizens in Rock Falls and LUGA Club, which was started by her mother-in-law.
She enjoyed gardening, baking, canning, crocheting and made clothing for children. She is survived by
her husband, Leonard R. Christiansen, of Mason City
daughter, Myrna M. Palzer of Corpus Christi, Texas
son, Leonard R. Christiansen, Jr. and his wife, Joan, of Mobile, Ala.
daughter, Laurie L. Stauffer and husband, Gary, of Sumner
brother, Darrell Deets of Nora Springs
four sisters, Audrey Hewitt of Nora Springs
Mildred Austin of Mason City
Laurine Kressin of Bloomer, Wis.
and Annabelle Christiansen and husband, Glen, of Nora Springs
nine grandchildren
and five great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her parents, one sister and seven brothers. Major Erickson Funeral Home & Crematory (515) 423-0924.

They had the following children:

  F i Myrna Mae Christiansen was born on 5 May 1939. She died on 5 Apr 2004.
  M ii Leonard Rufus Christiansen Jr. was born on 25 Dec 1941.
  F iii Laurie L Christiansen was born on 29 Jul 1946.

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